Coffee 101

Coffee Menu

  • Espresso: An espresso is made when pressurised water is forced through ground coffee and forms the base of many coffee drinks. A single shot of espresso should produce 25-30mls in approximately 25–30 seconds.
  • Latte: Add milk and 1cm of milk foam to your espresso base. A latte is traditionally served in a glass.
  • Piccolo Latte: A smaller, stronger latte served either in an espresso cup or an espresso sized latte glass.
  • Cappuccino: A cappuccino is traditionally served in a ceramic cup with equal amounts of espresso, steamed milk and frothed milk. The frothed milk may be added on top at the end with a spoon along with spinkled drinking chocolate.
  • Flat White: A flat white is served in a ceramic cup. Milk and a small amount of foam should be added to the espresso base.
  • Macchiato: Served in either a glass or a cup, a macchiato is an espresso base with a small stain of milk and a dollop of foam.
  • Doppio Espresso: A double espresso shot requires 22-24 grams of coffee extracted through a double portafilter handle. A double shot of espresso should produce 60-70mls in 25-30 seconds.
  • Long Black: An espresso is made when pressurised water is forced through ground coffee and forms the base of many coffee drinks. A single shot of espresso should produce 25-30mls in approximately 25–30 seconds
  • Long Macchiato: A long macchiato is a doppio espresso served in a glass with a dollop of foam and a small stain hot or cold milk. Water may also be added from the boiler.
  • Ristretto: The ristretto is the first or primary part of the coffee extraction within the first 15 seconds. A concentrated sweet shot of 15mls using the same amount of coffee as for an espresso. A ristretto is usually served in a small ceramic cup.
  • Doppio Ristretto: This strong, espresso sized coffee is made with a double shot of coffee. With only 30–35mls extracted in 15 seconds, this forms the base for any strong coffee.
  • Magic: A doppio ristretto served in a five ounce cup filled with flat white styled milk. Most commonly found in Melbourne.

Fresh Coffee Beans Tips

The Art of Hand Roasting 

Since 1969, The Coffee Company has been hand roasting coffee in store for our devoted and loyal customers. This history and heritage gives us our belief that small batch, drum roasting, is the best way to unlock a coffee’s true potential. Our coffee roaster provides remarkably even heat distribution and control. Unlike computerized roasters, this allows us to adjust the roast, so that outside variables like humidity, temperature, and barometric pressure - never negatively impact upon our roasts.

Since our batch sizes are small, we are able to keep our roasting process hands-on, responding immediately to sights, smells, and sounds, in order to capture just the right flavors at just the right moment. We roast daily to meet demand; the same coffee that we retail, we also wholesale. In fact, we don’t warehouse any coffee at all. The coffee you order today will be fresh roasted - every time.

Coffee Grinding

Using freshly roasted coffee beans, and grinding only what you require as you make each coffee, will help you achieve the perfect tasting cup. A good quality burr grinder is a worthwhile investment for making great coffee at home. It should grind the beans into consistent size particles. The particle size should be adjusted to suit different styles of coffee brewing (eg plunger, espresso machine, stovetop etc.).

It is essential to get the right grind for your preferred brewing method. See further information under each brewing method listed. If you don’t have a grinder at home, we are happy to grind your coffee for you upon purchase. Please select the appropriate brewing method when ordering.

Storage

To maximize the taste and freshness of your coffee, we recommend you store it in an airtight or vacuum pumped container - kept in a dark, dry, cool place like the pantry. Storing it in the fridge or freezer may affect its natural oils and alter the flavor. Whole beans stay fresher longer than pre-ground beans; where possible grind only the required amount of whole beans just prior to brewing.

Cafesti Machine Brewing Tips

The Espresso Base

  1. Start with delicious freshly roasted coffee.
  2. Each machine is different so start off by reading your manual closely. We recommend doing a home barista short course to enhance your enjoyment of espresso coffee making.
  3. Having the correct grind is especially crucial for electric espresso machines. As a general rule, the coffee should have a consistency similar to sand when rubbed between your fingers. Too coarse - and you will have a fast extraction, resulting a disappointingly weak brew. Too fine - and you will have an extraction of bitter coffee, dripping slowly into your cup. We are happy to advise you about how to achieve the correct grind.
  4. Fill the water reservoir.
  5. Allow your espresso machine and portafilter handle to warm up to the appropriate brewing temperature. Remember to pre-heat your cups too.
  6. Place your clean, dry, portafilter basket under the dosing mechanism of your grinder, and fill the basket until slightly heaped.
  7. Use your tamper to compress the coffee evenly using 15kg of pressure. Keep your arm and wrist in a straight line whilst tamping. Achieving an evenly compressed, and level biscuit of coffee within your basket is important. It is worth investing in a good quality tamper for this purpose.
  8. Lock the portafilter handle into the group head and start the extraction process without delay. Coffee left in the portafilter will burn quickly.
  9. The ideal extraction will leave a golden layer of aromatic, flavoursome foam known as 'crema' on top of your espresso. Too little crema may indicate that your grind is either too fine, or too course.
  10. A single shot of espresso should produce 25- 30mls in approximately 25 - 30 seconds. A double shot of espresso should produce 60mls in 25 seconds.
  11. If the coffee comes through too fast, try to grind your coffee finer. If it comes through too slow, grind your coffee a little more coarse and try again.
  12. Knock out the coffee biscuit from the portafilter into a knock box. The biscuit should be firm and crisp when it breaks.
  13. Other essential accessories include a knock box (for the grinds left over in the portafilter), barista cloths, a selection of cups, a tamper, milk jugs and a quality grinder.

Milk Texturing
  1. Carefully release a little steam from the wand to remove condensed water from the arm.
  2. Select the correct size and shape stainless steel milk jug, and amount of cold milk for your coffee (eg two cappuccinos will require only 300mls of milk). The jug should be filled between a third and half way.
  3. Place the steam wand into the milk and turn on the steam. The position of the steam wand in the milk is important for creating particular drinks. To create a thick cappuccino foam, keep the steam wand just under the milk surface, so you hear a gentle hissing sound. For a latte, start with the wand just below the milk surface; when the milk heats to 40 ºC, move the wand deeper into the milk for a thinner texture.
  4. Afterwards, position the steam wand over the tray, and release some steam to clear the wand.
  5. Wipe the steam arm clean with a soft damp barista cloth.
  6. Never heat milk over 70 °C degrees.
  7. Discard any unused milk.
  8. Pour your milk into your pre-prepared espresso base immediately. Pour drinks that require more foam first.
  9. Essential accessories include a selection of milk jugs, barista cloths, and a temperature guage.

Cafesti Machine Cleaning Tips

Cleaning your Cafesti machine

Equipment should be kept clean, set correctly, and well maintained. Any stale coffee in your machine or grinder will affect the flavour of your fresh coffee.

  1. Back flush your machine with the blind filter according to the manufacturers' instructions. If it's a domestic or super automatic machine, descale according to manufacturer's instructions.
  2. Clean the portafilter and shower screen with a group head brush.
  3. Clean any coffee build up from the baskets by rinsing and scouring.
  4. Use a chemical cleaning solution regularly to soak portafilter handles.
  5. Empty the drip tray, drain and rinse with water.
  6. Cleaning products are also available for the steaming wand.
  7. Clean the exterior of your machine with an appropriate surface cleaner.
  8. Essential accessories include chemical cleaning agents and group head brushes.

Everyday cleaning

    1. Whilst brewing, keep your machine parts and exterior coffee making area clean with purpose designed Cafessi Barista Cloths
    2. Clean any coffee build up from the baskets by rinsing and scouring
    3. Empty the drip tray and rinse with water

Regular cleaning

      1. Clean the shower screen with a Group Head Cleaning Brush
      2. Use Cafetto Evo Organic Cleaner to regularly soak porta-filter handles

Additional semi commercial and commercial machine cleaning

Back flush your machine every 4 kilograms of coffee (or every 2 months), using a Blind Filter and Cafetto Evo Organic Cleaner

Additional domestic and superautomatic machine cleaning

Descale your machine with Cafetto Descaler every 3 months according to the manufacturer's instructions.

Cocktail Based Coffee Tips

A Brief History of Coffee

The most popular story of the discovery of coffee centers around a young goat herder named Kaldi in the Ethiopian province of Kaffa around the late 6th century. Legend has it that he noticed a strange restlessness in his flock after they had eaten the berries and leaves of an unknown plant.

Monks from a nearby monastery heard of this phenomenon, and after various trials discovered that by roasting, grinding and infusing in water the seeds of this plant, a unique beverage could be obtained. This beverage helped to keep them awake during long hours of prayer. Word of this special drink quickly spread and it was soon drunk in coffee houses in the far away holy cities of Mecca and Medina. Propagation of the coffee bean began in Yemen and was well established by the 15th century.

To protect this valuable export, Arabian leaders banned the export of fertile beans. Eventually, a pilgrim named Baba Budan smuggled some viable seed berries out of the country, then returned to his home in India sometime during the 17th Century. The first coffee plant to be taken to Europe was stolen by Dutch traders in 1616 via the port of Mocha in Yemen. The Dutch then set up plantations throughout their colonies of Ceylon, Java, Timor, Sumatra, Celebes and Bali. In time coffee was also produced in the West Indies, Latin America, Jamaica, India and Brazil, which today produces over 60% of the world’s coffee production.

The first coffeehouses began in Mecca and soon spread throughout the Arab world. The idea of coffeehouses, where anyone could go to discuss culture and conduct business for the price of a coffee, flourished in Venice, Paris, London and North America in the 1600’s. This culture is still alive and well today with billions of cups of coffee being enjoyed worldwide every day.